I PHONE Panoramas

iPhone users can take panoramic photos with the built-in Camera app thanks to a new iPhone Panorama mode.

A panoramic photo is a great way to share a sweeping shot of landscape, a look at a new room inside or to capture a huge group of friends at a table.

Exposure and varying light. If one side of a street, for example, is very bright and the other very dark, in a panorama it will look very odd or can I use it as expression of my landscape?.

  • I might explore AE/AF lock to lock the exposure of an image. I might use this to great effect to get more dramatic lighting effects, keeping things darker or lighter. (Reminder to use it effectively:  press and hold on the screen where I want to lock the AE/AF before I start my panorama) 
  • Get light balanced, keep things steady and finally do things slowly. The app will tell me if I am  moving too fast. If I do things even slower I get the best possible results. Too slow and the Iphone will tell me.
  • A little bit tricky to work out where my panorama is going to end. I don’t need to take the entire length of the panorama. I can hit stop on the app at any time and images will be stitched together.  As often I get distracting elements such as lampposts into shots by accident.
  • Will get things like right angle rivers or oddly shaped streets if I don´t hit the Stop button at the right time, but this is the effect where I am going for. 
  • Before I  start taking the panorama, I have to think about where I am standing. If I Start in the wrong place and the photo can only turn out wrong.
  • Vertical panoramas can be just as stunning. (Aim the phone up at the sky for instance and then I hold it in landscape, tracing details like trees and the tops of buildings, to get a very cool effect. )
  • Composition: Most wide-angle and landscape shots closely obey the rule of thirds. If I want to follow this  I might line up the horizon in either the top or bottom third of a shot, keeping interesting elements either one third in from the left or one third in from the right.
  • I shouldn’t stick my subject directly in the centre of a shot. Have to Think about where my horizon is so it doesn’t intersect the centre of my subject.  (For instance: photographing a group in front of a big, wide landscape: I have to make sure the horizon is positioned in such a way that it doesn’t cut their heads in half)IPhonePanorama (1) IPhonePanorama (12) IPhonePanorama (11) IPhonePanorama (10) IPhonePanorama (5) IPhonePanorama (4) IPhonePanorama (3) IPhonePanorama (6) IPhonePanorama (7) IPhonePanorama (8)

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